concordia-memories.org Forum Index concordia-memories.org
Recalling Concordia's Past
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Dr. Rush Lynching

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    concordia-memories.org Forum Index -> Concordia Memories
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
roger.pape
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Mar 2009
Posts: 383
Location: Liverpool, NY

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 6:24 pm    Post subject: Dr. Rush Lynching Reply with quote

One of the less commendable incidents in the early history of Concordia involves the lynching of Dr. J. Rusch. An account of this episode by W. F. Walkenhorst can be found in Harry Voight's Concordia, Missouri A Centennial History (pp38ff). Briefly, a young, single doctor from Switzerland by the name of J. Rus(c)h arrived in Concordia in the early 1870s, living by himself in the 1000 block of St. Louis St. In 1873 and 1874, there was a rash of fires in various businesses and homes which were finally tracked back to Dr. Rush's house where a considerable amount of stolen property was found. Dr. Rush had set the fires to cover up his burglaries. When he was captured, an angry mob took him out just outside of Concordia and lynched him on the evening of Dec. 6, 1874.

While there was no Concordian or Thalbote at that time to report the event, it was reported the next day in the St. Louis Republican and the Dispatch as well as by the Sedalia Democrat and Bazoo and the Lexington Express. It was then picked up by a number of newspapers around the U.S. including such widespread places as Wheeling, WV; Athens, TN; Ashtabula, OH; Ebensburg, Ridgeway, and Somerset , PA; and Burlington, VT. [Note. These are cities whose early papers can be found posted on-line. The story was probably reported in many other papers.]

While most of the newspaper accounts were brief, several contain considerable detail beyond what is found in the centennial article. One of them can be found in the December 25, 1874 issue of The Andrew County Republican (Savannah, MO) containing some "purple prose" typical of many papers of that day. Another account appeared in the December 25, 1874 issue of the Burlington Weekly Free Press, which appears to be a reprint from the Sedalia (MO) Bazoo (also known for its embellished reporting). A very similar report (but paraphrased and slightly toned down) was printed in the December 23, 1874 issue of The Somerset Herald (Somerset, PA). They indicated that the information (probably a copy of the Bazoo article) had be sent to them by Henry Detert, a well-known merchant in Concordia. Did Henry have friends or relatives in Pennsylvania?


Last edited by roger.pape on Thu Feb 27, 2014 8:17 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
roger.pape
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Mar 2009
Posts: 383
Location: Liverpool, NY

PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 11:27 am    Post subject: Runge's Woods and the Concordia Oak Reply with quote

Cousin Myrna reminded me that, based on local legend (or at least according to George Miller), the Dr. Rush lynching occurred in Runge's Woods. The reference to "a strip of timber in the outer edge of the town", as noted in the Burlington Weekly Free Press article, certainly make that sound plausible.

Some of you probable remember the name "Runge's Woods" associated with the land on the north side of old Highway 40, just west of the north extension of current day Runge Rd. The land was originally part of the H. D. Bruns farm and was handed down to his son-in-law John Runge, Sr. The property is now owned by Wendell and Myrna Olson.

Since John Runge, Jr. was my uncle, I remember that land quite well. In the fall, we would clear the brush and fallen limbs and build a huge bonfire. That evening we would then have a family wiener roast and marshmallow toast. Boy Scout Troop 258 would also use the area for occasional campouts.

Note that the woods is also the place where the Concordia Oak was discovered. If you talk with Wendell or Myrna, they could point out the area were Dr. Rush was strung up. Is it possible that it was from a Concordia Oak tree?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    concordia-memories.org Forum Index -> Concordia Memories All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group